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Explosive Violence Monitor: 2014

For four years AOAV has tracked the use of explosive weapons around the world. Since 2011, almost 150,000 people have been reported killed or injured by weapons like rockets, mortars and car bombs. 

Civilians continue to bear the burden of explosive violence. In total AOAV recorded 41,847 deaths and injuries in 2014, 78% (32,662) of whom were civilians. Civilians were killed and wounded as they slept, shopped, worshipped or travelled.
 
The full report is available for download here:  Explosive Violence Monitor 2014

Key findings

  • AOAV recorded 41,847 casualties (people who were killed or  injured) by explosive weapons in 2,702 incidents in 2014. In 2013, AOAV had recorded 37,809 casualties from 2,430 incidents. 
  • Civilian casualties rose by 5% in 2014 from 2013. This is the third consecutive year in which recorded civilian casualties of explosive violence have increased. 
  • Of the casualties recorded in 2014, 78% were civilians (32,662 civilians killed and injured). 
  • Iraq, Syria, Gaza, Nigeria and Pakistan saw the highest numbers of civilian casualties in 2014. 
  • Over 10,000 civilian casualties from explosive weapons were recorded in Iraq for the second year running. 
  • Seven countries and territories had over 1,000 civilian deaths and injuries in 2014. In 2013 there were five such countries.
  • Gaza, Ukraine and Nigeria saw the biggest increases in civilian casualties from explosive weapons. 
  • Incidents were recorded in 58 countries and territories around the world. 
  • Civilian casualties from aerial explosive weapons in 2014 almost tripled from 2013 levels. 
  • State use of explosive weapons increased significantly in 2014. While responsibility cannot be assigned in many cases, where it was reported states caused 28% of recorded civilian casualties in 2014, up from 11% in 2013.

For more information on this report, please contact Iain Overton, AOAV’s Executive Director on +44 (0) 7984 645 145 or at ioverton@aoav.org.uk.