Categories

Global Counter-IED MapMilitary Counter-IED units

British Army C-IED/EOD units

British armyLocation: UK

Website: http://www.army.mod.uk/news/news.aspx

Type: Military

Many of those in the British Army will have had direct experience of IEDs, due to their popularity with insurgent forces throughout Iraq and Afghanistan. Many have been specifically trained to deal with the threat of IEDs for such missions. In Afghanistan and Iraq due to the IED threat there were specific task forces designed to deal with them – counter-IED task forces.

This knowledge and experience has been passed to other forces through training. UK forces have trained over 2,170 members of the Kurdish Security Forces in C-IED tactics and techniques. The Army extended this training effort as they also implemented a further C-IED training in Iraq for the Iraqi Security Forces in October 2015.

The Army are said to have already training 150 counter-IED specialists in Iraq.

It is hoped that this training will enable the Iraqi security forces to clear territory safely and return it to local people who have been displaced and unable to return to their homes.

The equipment used by the British Army for C-IED has included some of the most modern C-IED equipment. In 2010, the British introduced the Talisman – a selection of equipment specifically meant for C-IED work.

Talisman is comprised of armoured vehicles, optical cameras and remote-controlled vehicles. The remote capability of Talisman means soldiers are kept out of the contact zone of IEDs. Other vehicles and equipment used include a specially equipped Mastiff vehicle, known as ‘Protected Eyes’, and a Buffalo – both vehicles can deflect blasts.

There is also a Talon; armed with high tech optical equipment which can be operated from the safety of the armoured vehicles. Talon is used to detect and defeat the IED on the ground. Once the IED threat has been dealt with, the high mobility engineer excavator (HMEE) is brought into play. A HMEE is an armoured JCB which is used to repair any damage caused by IED blasts.

This profile is part of AOAV’s investigation into counter-IED (C-IED) actors around the globe. To see the list of all C-IED actors recorded by AOAV, see here. To see those engaged in the Middle East, the Sahel, North Africa or other highly impacted countries please see here, here, here, and here respectively. This research was made possible by funding from the NATO Counter Improvised Explosive Devices Centre of Excellence (C-IED COE). To read the full report, ‘Addressing the threat posed by IEDs: National, Regional and Global Initiatives’, see here.