Reverberating effects of explosive violence

Through 2017 and 2018, AOAV conducted in-depth field and desk research on the long-term harm from explosive weapons. Such research covers the reverberating impacts of explosive violence on areas such as health systems, economies, environments, cultures and societies.

Our main report, ‘When the bombs fall silent: the reverberating effects of explosive weapons’, examines such global harm by focusing on two case studies: the civil war in Sri Lanka, and the 33-day war between Israel and Lebanon. We focused on the North and East of Sri Lanka and the South of Lebanon for focus, but do not imply in that focus that the harm suffered by civilians in other parts of Sri Lanka or in Israel is not worthy of research and focus.

For our key findings, please go here. For the whole report, click here.

When the bombs fall silent: the reverberating effects of explosive weapons

Below is further research carried out by AOAV on the reverberating impacts of explosive violence, including case studies.

Case studies
North and East Sri Lanka case study: Long-term impacts of explosive violence on Health, Economy, Environment, Society, Culture

Southern Lebanon case study: Long-term impacts of explosive violence on Health, Economy, Environment, Society, Culture

Syria case study (2019)

AOAV also visited Mozambique for a landmine case study: Facing Life After Landmines Are Gone

Further articles

Kashmir (India and Pakistan): the reverberating impacts of explosive violence on education

An overview of the long-term harm resulting from the use of explosive weapons in populated areas – an analysis of the ten worst-impacted countries

AOAV believes that any use of explosive violence in populated areas causes terrible and unnecessary long-term harm.  Whether it has been suicide attacks by Hezbollah or the LTTE, or air-strikes by the Israeli or Sri Lankan militaries, explosive weapon use where civilians are present destroy lives and livelihoods, and create harm that continues for decades thereafter.

Also see AOAV’s 2019 report examining the reverberating impact of explosive weapon use in Syria.