Ukraine: uncovering the devastation of Mariupol

The report “‘Our City Was Gone’: Russia’s Devastation of Mariupol, Ukraine” by Human Rights Watch, Truth Hounds, and SITU Research documents the extensive civilian and infrastructural damage caused by the Russian military assault on Mariupol in 2022, calling for accountability for apparent war crimes.

Ministry of Defence refuses to detail Prince Harry’s 25 ‘combat kills’; claims it would cost too much

The British Ministry of Defence has refused a Freedom of Information request by AOAV to disclose details about Prince Harry’s reported killing of 25 Taliban fighters during his military service in Afghanistan.

British military deliberates: is releasing details of alleged war crimes to AOAV in public interest?

The UK Ministry of Defence delays releasing details on alleged war crimes by the UK military, citing a need to balance public interest and investigations, amidst AOAV’s call for transparency and accountability.

UK government faces legal challenge over MOD refusal to detail civilian harm

The upcoming tribunal challenging the UK Ministry of Defence’s refusal to disclose details on civilian casualties in Iraq and Syria marks a crucial moment for military transparency, with Airwars advocating for openness akin to that of the US and Dutch governments.

Briefing note: AOAV calls for UK policy reform on reparations for civilian harm in military operations

AOAV critically examines the UK’s lack of a comprehensive policy on reparations for civilian harm caused by its military operations and proposes significant reforms to align with international humanitarian law and ensure justice for affected civilians.

Who oversees the SAS? AOAV praises the APPG on Modern Conflict’s report ‘Accountability and Oversight of UK Special Forces’

The report advocates for enhanced parliamentary oversight and accountability of UK Special Forces in response to concerns over the ‘no comment’ policy and the absence of external scrutiny.

Independent Inquiry relating to Afghanistan: day 3

The Inquiry into allegations of severe war crimes involving a campaign of murder by UK Special Forces in Afghanistan, which was purportedly known and permitted by Senior Officers and the MOD, unravels a harrowing narrative of civilian deaths, potential cover-ups, and an organizational culture that enabled sustained, egregious violations of human rights, with the bereaved families seeking justice amidst institutional obfuscation and delayed inquiries.

Independent Inquiry relating to Afghanistan: day 2

Brian Altman, representing the Ministry of Defence, underscored the UK Armed Forces’ commitment to legal standards and operational integrity in Afghanistan, while Paul Greaney highlighted the Royal Military Police’s role in maintaining accountability and addressing allegations against military personnel, with both emphasizing respect for lives lost and adherence to international obligations.

Independent Inquiry relating to Afghanistan: day 1

On the first day of the Independent Inquiry Relating to Afghanistan, Lord Justice Haddon-Cave and Oliver Glasgow KC highlighted allegations of extrajudicial killings by UK Special Forces between 2010-2013, with Glasgow outlining seven crucial cases and emphasizing the Inquiry’s commitment to unveiling the truth and ensuring justice.

Collecting and Sharing Data on Explosive Weapons Use

A Prerequisite for understanding impact, informing change and implementing the Political Declaration

Is UK defence spending worth it? A call for a national debate about who, in the end, really benefits from Britain’s arms trade

The UK’s significant investment in the defence industry, highlighted by the recent DSEI exhibition, raises concerns about its true beneficiaries, as financial trends suggest international shareholders gain the most, despite defence’s modest contribution to the national economy, necessitating greater transparency, accountability, and a reevaluation of investment priorities for genuine national benefit.

A Disarming Debate: findings from a one day seminar

The report provides an overview of the conference ‘A Disarming Debate: Challenging Militarism in British Academia,’ which addressed concerns about the influence of the military-industrial complex on UK universities.